Skip to main content

Blog

Long-term exposure to pollution linked to depression, study finds [washingtonpost.com]

By Kelly Kasulis Cho, Photo: Dan Kitwood/Getty Images, The Washington Post, February 2, 2023 Long-term exposure to even low levels of air pollution is linked to increased incidence of depression and anxiety, a U.K. study suggests, adding to a wave of evidence that fossil fuels may be negatively impacting mental health. Researchers in the United Kingdom and China followed nearly 390,000 adults in the U.K. for roughly 11 years and found long-term exposure to multiple air pollutants was...

The funding cliff for student mental health [axios.com]

By Sabrina Moreno, Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios, Axios, February 2, 2023 Public school districts that received a windfall of COVID relief funds for mental health services are confronting a new dilemma: How to sustain counseling, screenings, teletherapy and other programs when the money runs out. Why it matters: The youth mental health crisis is not getting better , and schools are increasingly being pressed into service as first responders amid rising rates of suicidal ideation,...

New gun deaths data in U.S. show continued rise in suicides [harvardpublichealth.org]

By Maura Kelly, Illustration: Mary Delaware, Harvard Public Health, February 1, 2023 he gun control debate always heats up after a mass shooting, as it has in the wake of the twin shootings in California last month. The summer’s mass shootings in Buffalo, New York, and Uvalde, Texas, finally spurred lawmakers to action with the passage of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act bill, the first meaningful piece of gun legislation in two decades. But the U.S. gun problem is still the world’s...

Ironically, today we "celebrate" Waitangi Day and yet....The case of a father that loved his children

Te Tiriti o Waitangi is to protect both Māori and non-Māori. This post is to honour a father who lost almost everything in his pursuit to protect his children from harm and to ensure they accessed quality education because he loved them This post is to honour all fathers who are denied their right to be a father simply because they are men. New Zealand is a nation that is like a pendulum. We move between polar opposites. We can't seem to find balance. In days gone by, women were once...

Survivor Stories with guest Michael Skinner - YouTube

Survivor Stories with guest Michael Skinner - YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIcufSmFCXo&t=33s A thought provoking discussion and insight on healing from trauma and sexual abuse. Presented by Ask A Sex Abuse Survivor - Amplifying survivor voices worldwide "I attended this event, and Michael has a gentle approach to making sexual and physical trauma stories become meaningful and a source of hope." - Jacek_Jack Haciak

Parenting, Policies and Laws, and the Social Determinants of Health

Here’s a thought. Kids who experience parenting behaviors and practices generally recognized as supporting the healthy development of children often grow into kind, responsible, hardworking, ethical adults who don’t behave in ways that harm themselves and others. Over the years Congress created policies and laws that are detrimental to public health. Now we are faced with the monumental task of changing those policies and laws. If Congress had been made up of people who had experienced...

Greater adversity in childhood linked to premature aging in midlife and beyond [medicalxpress.com]

By McMaster University, Image: Aging Cell (2023), MedicalXpress, February 1, 2023 Exposure to a greater number of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) may accelerate biological aging in older adults, a McMaster University study has found. The research was published online in the journal Aging Cell . The study analyzed data from 1,445 participants aged 45 to 85 years from the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging. The participants provided blood samples for DNA methylation analysis and...

How to take in traumatic news events and preserve your mental health [sfchronicle.com]

By Catherine Ho, Photo: Justin Sullivan, Staff/Getty Images, San Francisco Chronicle, February 1, 2023 Last week brought a relentless wave of horrific news events: two California mass shootings two days apart, the release of video footage showing Memphis police officers’ violent beating of Tyre Nichols, and the release of a body-cam recording showing an intruder’s attack on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s husband Paul in the couple’s San Francisco home. Each incident was disturbing, and in some...

From Jan. 6 to Tyre Nichols, American Life Is Still Defined by Caste [time.com]

By Isabel Wilkerson, Artwork: Lavett Ballard/TIME, Photography: Eric James Montgomery, TIME, February 2, 2023 How did our country arrive at this moment of rupture and fury? How is it that mass shootings, even of children in their classrooms, and police killings of unarmed citizens of color like Tyre Nichols have become a feature of our days? How is it that politicians are banning books in a country whose founding First Amendment protects the right to free speech? How is it that the U.S.,...

It's Black History Month. Here are 3 things to know about the annual celebration [npr.org]

By Scott Neuman, Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/AFP/Getty Images, National Public Radio (NPR), February 1, 2023 February marks Black History Month, a tradition that got its start in the Jim Crow era and was officially recognized in 1976 as part of the nation's bicentennial celebrations. It aims to honor the contributions that African Americans have made and to recognize their sacrifices. Here are three things to know about Black History Month: It was Negro History Week before it was Black History...

2023 – Black Resistance [asalh.org]

By Association for the Study of African American Life and History, February 2023 African Americans have resisted historic and ongoing oppression, in all forms, especially the racial terrorism of lynching, racial pogroms, and police killings since our arrival upon these shores. These efforts have been to advocate for a dignified self-determined life in a just democratic society in the United States and beyond the United States political jurisdiction. The 1950s and 1970s in the United States...

For Black History Month, a look at what Black Americans say is needed to overcome racial inequality [pewresearch.org]

By Jens Manuel Krogstad and Kiana Cox, Photo: Erik McGregor/LightRocket/Getty Images, Pew Research Center, January 20, 2023 Black History Month originated in 1926 as Negro History Week. Created by Carter G. Woodson, a Black historian and journalist, the week celebrated the achievements of Black Americans following their emancipation from slavery. Since 1928, the organization that Woodson founded, the Association for the Study of African American Life and History, has selected an annual theme...

Op-Ed: The video of Tyre Nichols’ murder is unbearable. But it shows why we need stories of both Black pain — and joy [latimes.com]

By Cassandra Lane, Image: Orion Pictures, Los Angeles Times, February 1, 2023 The murder of Tyre Nichols and the individual and collective reckoning we have all encountered — whether or not to witness the brutal images of his final moments — sent me back to an issue that I’ve been wrestling with for two decades. In the fall of 2001, I started writing the seeds of a book project with the intention of examining the multigenerational reverberations of my great-grandfather’s lynching. I started...

What determines the success of movements today? [wagingviolence.org]

By Cathy Rogers, Photo: Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images, WagingNonviolence, January 31, 2023 Anyone who has come across “ Why Civil Resistance Works ” by Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan will be familiar with the idea that size matters for social movements. Their highly cited “3.5 percent rule” says that once movements actively involve at least 3.5 percent of the population they will inevitably succeed. The idea that this is a cast iron rule has been contested — including by Chenoweth — on the...

Childhood Adversity Tied to Race-Related Differences in Brain Development [medpagetoday.com]

By Michael DePeau-Wilson, MedPageToday, February 1, 2023 Gray matter volume in key brain regions was lower in Black children compared with white children, likely due to disparities in childhood adversity, according to data from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development ( ABCD ) study. Among children ages 9 to 10 years, white kids showed greater gray matter volumes compared with Black kids in the amygdala, hippocampus, frontal pole, superior frontal gyrus, rostral anterior cingulate, pars...

Post
Copyright © 2022, PACEsConnection. All rights reserved.
×
×
×
×