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Disability Inclusion Benefits Everyone (rwjf.org)

A group of people representing a range of disabilities and various races, ethnicities, ages, and genders cross a bridge made of speech bubbles to demonstrate how continued conversation and commitment support inclusion and accessibility. Photo credit: Gracia Lam. To read more of Javier Robles article, please click here. EDITOR’S NOTE: We all want to live in communities where everyone has a fair and just opportunity to thrive, and disability rights advocate Javier Robles has been dismantling...

Heartbreaking tribute to Uvalde school shooting victims at San Antonio's Muertosfest (tpr.org)

Jack Morgan/Lanier High School's Día de Muertos altar Author: To read Jack Morgan's article, please click here. People throughout South Texas are celebrating Día de los Muertos by building colorful altars and decorating them with photos of their lost loved ones, flowers and their favorite foods. The citywide celebration Muertosfest has included a monument specifically honoring the children and teachers lost to the Uvalde school shooting Muertosfest’s Chris Davila said 80 altars were set up...

48-Hour Historical Trauma Specialist Certification Program- COHORT 1 & 2

New!! 48-HOUR HISTORICAL TRAUMA SPECIALIST CERTIFICATION in collaboration with THE INTERNATIONAL HISTORICAL TRAUMA ASSOCIATION We are the only entity offering a comprehensive, 48-hour Historical Trauma Specialist Certification Program. The Program is broken into 6 levels and is built on a foundation of BIPOC cultures and neurobiology. It is taught from a multicultural perspective, injecting traditions and ideology from various cultures from around the world. In this inclusive study we rely...

Real-world problems are no match for this new crop of Latina superheroes (kqed.org)

Kayden Phoenix's A La Brava superhero team, whose motto is "Dream big, mija." (A La Brava comics) Author: To read Mandalit del Barco's article, please click here. In the multiverse of superheroes, some comic book and graphic novel creators are using Latina characters to challenge real-life issues. New Yorker Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez created La Borinqueña, a Puerto Rican superhero who crusades for issues affecting the Caribbean island – including climate change, economic displacement,...

7 Groundbreaking Inventions by Latino Innovators (history.com)

Found Image Holdings/Corbis via Getty Images Author: Karen Juanita Carrillo's article, please click here. Latino inventors have created revolutionary devices that have transformed our everyday world—and often changed how we live. These innovations have helped advance technological, pharmaceutical and environmental products that we use daily. Below are a list of inventions by Latinos in the United States and those born in Latin America. 1. Color TV The upgrades from black-and-white to color...

How to Decolonize Mental Health Treatment for BIPOC (yesmagazine.org)

Illustration by GOOD STUDIO / ADOBE STOCK Author Gabe Torres / Yes Magazine / 7.28.22 How to Decolonize Mental Health Treatment for BIPOC Note: Whenever you read the terms BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, and people of color), racialized people, and racially marginalized, I mean them synonymously while understanding the distinctiveness of experiences and respective identities of racially oppressed peoples. Whenever I refer to BIPOC, I refer to us as “we,” because I, the writer, identify as a person...

Vital Signs: Drug Overdose Deaths, by Selected Sociodemographic and Social Determinants of Health Characteristics — 25 States and the District of Columbia, 2019–2020 (cdc.gov)

Summary What is already known about this topic? Drug overdose deaths increased 30% in the United States from 2019 to 2020. Known health disparities exist in overdose mortality rates, particularly among certain racial/ethnic minority populations. What is added by this report? From 2019 to 2020, overdose death rates increased by 44% and 39% among non-Hispanic Black (Black) and non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native persons, respectively. As county-level income inequality increased,...

How we pronounce Uvalde says a lot about the power of language in mixed communities (npr.org)

Because Uvalde is a town made up of mostly Latino or Hispanic residents, according to the U.S. Census Bureau data, landing on a "correct" pronunciation is tricky — the language of the people who live there exists on a sliding spectrum between Spanish and English, and often consists of a combination of the two. But how we say Uvalde matters, because it represents a long lineage of how Latinos have been racialized in the U.S. and in South Texas, specifically. But Uvalde is just one example of...

In the Latino community, pandemic-fueled poverty triggers a silent crisis in mental health (centerforhealthjournalism.org)

Our Voice Nuestra Voz, a group that advocates for Spanish-speaking parents and the education of their children, meets online weekly to talk about challenges in school. But when the hour is up and the livestream ends, the conversation turns intimate. Parents open up about the stress and anxiety they’ve experienced during the COVID-19 pandemic. Some cry, even though they feel shame for doing it. “When they share personal experiences, they are constantly apologizing, ‘I’m sorry for saying this...

What Does Community Development for Liberation Look Like? (nonprofitquarterly.org)

Earlier this month, a small group of roughly 50 people gathered in San Juan, Puerto Rico to discuss what a liberatory movement for community economic development might look like. For many, it was their first in-person conference since the COVID-19 pandemic. The convener? CEO Circle, an informal network of leaders of color of national community development organizations. Founding members of the loose network are Akilah Watkins-Butler of the Center for Community Progress , Tony Pickett of...

PHC6534: Educational Intervention on the Compounding Effects of Stigma on Mental Health and ACEs in Hispanic Communities

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) have been linked to mental health illnesses such as anxiety and depression. In Hispanic culture, mental illness is largely stigmatized which greatly affects individuals from seeking the help they need. This further perpetuates mental illnesses due to ACEs. Miami-Dade County has a large Hispanic population that experiences high levels of poverty. Miami Dade has high rates of violence, domestic and gun violence which are factors that contribute to ACEs. To...

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