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Helping Young Children Who Have Experienced Trauma: Policies and Strategies for Early Care and Education [ChildTrends.org] [Re-posting from ACES in Child Care]

This report from Child Trends and the National Center for Children in Poverty includes a review of the prevalence of early childhood trauma and its effects. The report offers promising strategies for child care and preschool programs looking to help young children who have endured trauma, and presents recommendations for policymakers to support trauma-informed early care. [For more of this story go to https://www.childtrends.org/publications/ecetrauma/ ]

Ready for kindergarten? Gap between rich and poor narrows, Stanford study finds (scienceblog.com)

On the first day of kindergarten, poor children are already behind. But the distance they need to cover to start school on par with richer kids has shortened – in spite of widening economic inequality – according to surprising new research co-authored by Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE) Professor Sean Reardon . The study, conducted with Stanford GSE alumna Ximena Portilla, compared the achievement gaps between high- and lower-income children kindergarten in 1998 and 2010 using the...

New Study Shows Communities Can Reduce the Effects of Adverse Childhood Experiences [Mathematica Policy Research]

A new study commissioned by the Adverse Childhood Experiences Public-Private Initiative (APPI) of Washington State finds that communities can create effective, local strategies that reduce the long-term social, emotional and physical problems related to abuse, neglect, and other Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). Research shows that the prevalence of 10 specific ACEs—such as witnessing domestic violence or experiencing physical abuse—trigger a stress response that can harm a child’s...

How Trauma is Changing Children’s Brains [NEA Today]

Read more about the traumatized brain from NEA Today. For several years, John Snelgrove began his workweek with a lengthy fax from the local police, listing the home addresses where officers had answered domestic violence calls over the weekend. Snelgrove, head of guidance services for Brockton (Mass.) Public Schools, would check those addresses against the district’s student database. When a match came up, he’d alert the counselor at that child’s school, who, in turn, would take a red...

Building Children's Brains [New York Times]

Take a look at today's article from Nick Kristof in the New York Times on the importance of early learning and challenges faced by children in poverty. Building Children's Brains Nicolas Kristof First, a quiz: What’s the most common “vegetable” eaten by American toddlers? Answer: The French fry. The same study that unearthed that nutritional tragedy also found that on any given day, almost half of American toddlers drink soda or similar drinks, possibly putting the children on a trajectory...

Drexel Studies Show Intergenerational Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Food Insecurity [ASPPH]

ASPPH | Drexel Studies Show Intergenerational Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Food Insecurity New research from Drexel University’s Center for Hunger-Free Communities has added evidence on the relationship between food insecurity and adverse child experiences (ACEs). One study of 1255 female caregivers of young children, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine , found that depressive symptoms and ACEs were independently associated with household and child food...

One Neighborhood at a Time [New York Times]

A good article from David Brooks with the New York Times that relates to our work in Pottstown. I like this quote toward the end of the article, '"What’s the right level to pursue social repair? The nation may be too large. The individual is too small. The community is the right level..." LOST HILLS, Calif. — What is the central challenge facing our era? My answer would be: social isolation. Gaps have opened up among partisan tribes, economic classes and races. There has been a loss of...

Studying How Poverty Keeps Hurting Young Minds, and What to Do About It [New York Times]

Take a look at this article from the New York Times concerning the impact of trauma on the developing brain. The human brain begins as a neural tube that develops five weeks after conception. Years later, it is fully formed. On Tuesday, experts in neuroscience, genetics and social work met in Manhattan to talk about what can happen to it along the way, and what emerging research tells us about how children who seem broken can be made whole. Officially, the meeting was called Poverty, the...

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