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November 2020

Join Us for a Webinar - Addressing Historic Trauma in Indian Country: Funding and Implementing Trauma-Informed Programming in the Wake of the COVID-19 Pandemic

Dec 4, 2020 03:00 PM in Eastern Time (US and Canada) How does historic trauma impact contemporary Native American communities and how can Tribal communities, the federal government, and community organizations work together to address and mitigate those impacts? Van Ness Feldman and the Roundtable on Native American Trauma-Informed Initiatives* invite you to a webinar featuring Dr. Tami DeCoteau, a leader in identifying and implementing successful approaches to trauma-informed care and Van...

Seeking Interviewees for ACEs Aware Dissertation

Hello ACEs Connection Community! My name is Skylar Hanson, I am a Doctor of Public Health candidate at Claremont Graduate University in Southern California. The focus of my dissertation is on the implementation of California's ACEs Aware Initiative and how the initiative navigated and responded to the needs of a COVID-19 impacted society (as well as other stressors of this year). I have been interviewing a range of participants from backgrounds of family medicine, pediatricians, social work,...

How U.S. Medical Schools Are Training a Post-Pandemic Generation of Doctors [time.com]

By Jamie Ducharme, Time, November 24, 2020 In February 2019, the Kaiser Permanente health system announced a new kind of medical school. The school would be built “from the ground up” to prepare students for the complexities of the U.S. medical system. The curriculum would emphasize cultural competency, patient and provider well-being, and the elimination of socioeconomic disparities in the medical system. Students would see patients right away, and hands-on learning would replace many...

ACEs Aware Grantee Provider Training: Cross-sector strategies for implementation

A series of trainings are scheduled for December and January for providers in regions across California. The series is intended for primary care, acute care, and behavioral health providers and focuses on “Advancing Trauma-Informed Communities” to improve knowledge and capacity for utilizing community resources in the referral process. The goals of these trainings are to: a) increase provider insight into ACEs prevalence, b) develop screening capacity, c) explore tools to assess your local...

Changing “The Elf on the Shelf” to “HELP on the Shelf”

- by Kristin Beasley, PhD The Elf on the Shelf, Santa’s number 1 helper has joined more than 13 million homes and the popularity seems to continue to grow. Here’s how it works as written in the description on Amazon.com “The Scout Elf is placed on a shelf or somewhere in the house to watch your children throughout the day, then each night the elf returns to the North Pole to tell Santa Clause whether your family has been naughty or nice. With this information, Santa decides if you are...

New nonprofit breast milk bank launches in San Diego (sandiegouniontribune.com)

San Diego — Every year, about 260 of the tiniest premature babies in California hospitals develop an often-fatal bowel disease known as necrotizing enterocolitis, or NEC. Nobody knows what causes NEC, but a common factor in many cases is the use of formula to feed these very low-birth-weight babies because the mother’s breast milk is not available. Replacing that formula with pasteurized breast milk in every California hospital newborn intensive care unit could be a positive step in reducing...

The Latest Updates from California Children's Trust

Read on to learn about our recent work to advance the transformation of children's mental health. Listen to recordings of other Critical Conversations, and find out how we are Raising Awareness and Taking Action With Our Partners. Critical Conversations In Case You Missed These Webinars NAMI Annual Conference. On October 12 Alex Briscoe and Jevon Wilkes, CCT’s Director or Youth Engagement and the Executive Director of California Youth Coalition (CCY) presented results from a new survey on...

Ventura County declares racism a.com] public health crisis [latimes.com]

By Hayley Smith, Los Angeles Times, November 17, 2020 The Ventura County Board of Supervisors has unanimously approved a resolution declaring racism a public health crisis. Spurred by the recent killings of Ahmaud Arbery , Breonna Taylor and George Floyd — and by a nationwide history of discrimination and oppression against Black people, Indigenous people and other people of color — the resolution was the result of a months-long collaboration between county officials and community groups.

California's vaccine plan will prioritize Blacks and Latinos, among others. Here's why [sacbee.com]

By Hannah Wiley and Kim Bojorquez, The Sacramento Bee, November 19, 2020 Take a look at California’s COVID-19 caseload maps , and it’s easy to spot where rates are highest: in some of the state’s most diverse and low-income communities. The virus has ravaged urban centers like Los Angeles, infiltrated rural Imperial County and flooded the farmlands of the Central Valley. But COVID-19 does not claim its victims equally. Latinos make up 40% of the Golden State’s population, but 60% of its...

A New Era of Student Access at California's Community Colleges [ppic.org]

By Marisol Cuellar Mejia, Olga Rodriguez, and Hans Johnson, Public Policy Institute of California, November 2020 Until recently, the vast majority of California’s community college students—hundreds of thousands of students each year—started in remedial courses that slowed down or halted their academic progress. Attrition was high, particularly for Latino and African American students. Few students went on to complete the gateway courses necessary to transfer to a four-year college (known as...

Disappointing grades, technology glitches and glimpses of learning fun [edsource.org]

By EdSource Staff, EdSource, November 19, 2020 Seven months after school campuses closed, Mayra Guzman, a parent in Fresno County, summed it up for just about everyone: “I feel miserable.” While some students have acclimated to distance learning and even thrived, most in EdSource’s project following California families on how they are coping with Covid-19, are still struggling with spotty internet access, technical glitches and the frustration of not seeing friends and teachers in person.

How a Deadly Police Force Ruled a City [newyorker.com]

By Shane Bauer, The New Yorker, November 16, 2020 Three police officers in an unmarked pickup truck pulled into the parking lot of a Walgreens in Vallejo, California, responding to a call of looting in progress. It was just after midnight on June 2nd, and a group of people who had gathered around a smashed drive-through window quickly fled in two cars. Sean Monterrosa, a twenty-two-year-old from San Francisco, was left behind. As the police truck closed in on Monterrosa, Jarrett Tonn, a...

'For Many Years I Didn't Believe I Was Human' [jjie.org]

By Z, Juvenile Justice Information Exchange, November 9, 2020 In 2000, I was 14 years old, in Los Angeles’ Skid Row. You wouldn’t believe such a Third World slum existed within history’s richest country; oh, but it did. It does. A section of one of the world’s most glamorous cities set aside to hide thousands of homeless people, to hide America’s unwillingness to deal with poverty, mental health, drug addiction and homelessness. It’s all swept under the rug, or under the shadow of downtown’s...

How school discipline - and student misbehavior - has changed during the pandemic [edsource.org]

By Carolyn Jones, EdSource, November 17, 2020 Student misbehavior hasn’t vanished during distance learning, but schools are finding that imposing discipline in a virtual environment is a complicated and often murky process, and that current laws don’t neatly apply to online behavior. The California Department of Education has not yet released suspension and expulsion data from the 2019-20 school year, but teachers and advocates interviewed by EdSource say school discipline, such as...

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